HA HA HA HA


Self Confident

Low: Low scorers tend to be relatively assertive, comfortable talking about themselves, and can tolerate—if not enjoy—attention and praise. If you’re low in echoism, just make sure you’re not also high in extreme narcissism.

Tips: You’re doing really well, especially if you score high on healthy narcissism and low on extreme narcissism.  If you’re extremely low, to ensure that your healthy sense of self doesn’t turn into unchecked arrogance, make sure you take emotional risks in your relationships, sharing highs and lows, traumas and triumphs, paying close how much you listen and how much you talk.

High: Healthy narcissism means you’re empathic, ambitious, caring and confident.. As long as you’re not high in extreme narcissism, too, you’re doing great!

Tips: If you’re high in healthy narcissism, you’re one of the lucky people who’ve found life in the center of the narcissism spectrum, where people dream big but not at the expense of their relationships.  If you’re really high, you need to be careful not to let your narcissism spike into the unhealthy range. Be open about your ups and downs, seek help when needed, and don’t ever feel afraid to say I’m sorry. It fosters the kind of intimacy that keeps you in the healthy range.

High: High scorers tend to be selfish, manipulative, demanding, and often arrogant. An extremely high score could even mean you’re an extreme narcissist, though if you’re under age 25, this could change over time. If you’re high in echoism as well—unusual—you might vacillate between being demanding and conceited and feeling worthless.

Tips: If you scored high on extreme narcissism, even in combination with high echoism, you need to work on opening up and sharing real vulnerability—sadness, fear, loneliness.

Make a list of all the ways you dodge genuine feelings—attacking, criticizing, defending, arguing. Write in detail about the more vulnerable feelings you notice inside when you act this way. Then share them, no matter how hard it feels. Practice empathizing with people by imagining yourself in their shoes in as much detail as possible. Research has shown that this actually boosts empathy in narcissists.

Understanding and controlling narcissism is the key to living a passionate and fulfilling life. Help others grasp the importance of measuring narcissism by using the #SoWe hashtag and sharing the Narcissism Test—along with tips for keeping narcissism in check—on social media!
The brief narcissism test is informal, not diagnostic. For a more accurate picture and to pin point where you are in the spectrum, you’ll need to take the full test included in Rethinking Narcissism.
A final note from Dr. Craig Malkin
I hope this informal narcissism assessment has been helpful to you! I’m on a mission to address the “narcissism epidemic” by illuminating the spectrum of narcissism, identifying ways to control the trait, and explaining how too little of it may be a bad thing. That’s the heartbeat behind my new book, Rethinking Narcissism: The Bad-and Surprising Good-About Feeling Special, which is available now. I was honored that Library Journal called the book “a true gem on the subject of narcissism” and I hope you’ll find it helpful in your life.
Will you help me spread the word about this assessment?
If you have friends that could benefit from learning more about where they fall on the spectrum, click below to share it with them and we hope you’ll join the conversation on the #SoWe hashtag on Twitter or Facebook.

High: High echoism means you’re worried about burdening others and rarely assert your needs. You might often “echo” or mirror” what other people want instead of sharing your preferences. If you’re only slightly elevated, bordering on the red zone, you might even be a “caretaker”, more focused on other peoples needs than your own—sometimes to your detriment.

Tips: If you’re high in echoism, you need to take some steps to embrace some healthy narcissism. Remind yourself you’re entitled to feeling disappointment when your feelings and perspective aren’t taken into account, and you have a right to say no (respectfully). But you can also benefit by boosting your ego in direct ways: make a list of attributes that matter to you most: patience, honesty, warmth, kindness, persistence. Keep notes each week describing experiences where you’ve displayed the values, and how much more (or less) characteristic they are of you than your peers. Research shows that this simple exercise boosts self-image and wellbeing over the course of just one week.

High: Healthy narcissism means you’re empathic, ambitious, caring and confident.. As long as you’re not high in extreme narcissism, too, you’re doing great!

Tips: If you’re high in healthy narcissism, you’re one of the lucky people who’ve found life in the center of the narcissism spectrum, where people dream big but not at the expense of their relationships.  If you’re really high, you need to be careful not to let your narcissism spike into the unhealthy range. Be open about your ups and downs, seek help when needed, and don’t ever feel afraid to say I’m sorry. It fosters the kind of intimacy that keeps you in the healthy range.

High: High scorers tend to be selfish, manipulative, demanding, and often arrogant. An extremely high score could even mean you’re an extreme narcissist, though if you’re under age 25, this could change over time. If you’re high in echoism as well—unusual—you might vacillate between being demanding and conceited and feeling worthless.

Tips: If you scored high on extreme narcissism, even in combination with high echoism, you need to work on opening up and sharing real vulnerability—sadness, fear, loneliness.

Make a list of all the ways you dodge genuine feelings—attacking, criticizing, defending, arguing. Write in detail about the more vulnerable feelings you notice inside when you act this way. Then share them, no matter how hard it feels. Practice empathizing with people by imagining yourself in their shoes in as much detail as possible. Research has shown that this actually boosts empathy in narcissists.

But if you show the healthiest pattern (low echoism, high healthy narcissism, and average/low extreme narcissism), keep up the great work. You no doubt have wonderful relationships and passion for life!

Understanding and controlling narcissism is the key to living a passionate and fulfilling life. Help others grasp the importance of measuring narcissism by using the #SoWe hashtag and sharing the Narcissism Test—along with tips for keeping narcissism in check—on social media!
The brief narcissism test is informal, not diagnostic. For a more accurate picture and to pin point where you are in the spectrum, you’ll need to take the full test included in Rethinking Narcissism.
A final note from Dr. Craig Malkin
I hope this informal narcissism assessment has been helpful to you! I’m on a mission to address the “narcissism epidemic” by illuminating the spectrum of narcissism, identifying ways to control the trait, and explaining how too little of it may be a bad thing. That’s the heartbeat behind my new book, Rethinking Narcissism: The Bad-and Surprising Good-About Feeling Special, which is available now. I was honored that Library Journal called the book “a true gem on the subject of narcissism” and I hope you’ll find it helpful in your life.
Will you help me spread the word about this assessment?
If you have friends that could benefit from learning more about where they fall on the spectrum, click below to share it with them and we hope you’ll join the conversation on the #SoWe hashtag on Twitter or Facebook.
test 3

Neutral on most – unsure about myself – don’t like talking about myself.

High: High echoism means you’re worried about burdening others and rarely assert your needs. You might often “echo” or mirror” what other people want instead of sharing your preferences. If you’re only slightly elevated, bordering on the red zone, you might even be a “caretaker”, more focused on other peoples needs than your own—sometimes to your detriment.

Tips: If you’re high in echoism, you need to take some steps to embrace some healthy narcissism. Remind yourself you’re entitled to feeling disappointment when your feelings and perspective aren’t taken into account, and you have a right to say no (respectfully). But you can also benefit by boosting your ego in direct ways: make a list of attributes that matter to you most: patience, honesty, warmth, kindness, persistence. Keep notes each week describing experiences where you’ve displayed the values, and how much more (or less) characteristic they are of you than your peers. Research shows that this simple exercise boosts self-image and wellbeing over the course of just one week.

Average: You’re about as emotionally open, self-confident, comfortable with praise, and ambitious as the average person.

Tips: You’re doing well especially if you’re bordering on the high end of healthy narcissism. The only caveat to this is if your extreme narcissism is high. If so, pay close attention to the tips you receive there.

In the mean, time, it’s never a bad idea to keep working on your self-esteem, and the easiest way to do that is by being emotionally open with those you love and —research suggests that people who comfortably depend on others their relationships maintain their narcissism at healthy levels.

Low: If you’re low in extreme narcissism, you’re more humble, less entitled, more cooperative, but maybe a little less outgoing than the average person.  You may or may not have low self-esteem. That depends on how high your healthy narcissism is.

Tips: If you’re low in both extreme and healthy narcissism, pay close attention to the tips you received for boosting your narcissism to healthy levels and reducing your echoism.

But if you show the healthiest pattern (low echoism, high healthy narcissism, and average/low extreme narcissism), keep up the great work. You no doubt have wonderful relationships and passion for life!

Understanding and controlling narcissism is the key to living a passionate and fulfilling life. Help others grasp the importance of measuring narcissism by using the #SoWe hashtag and sharing the Narcissism Test—along with tips for keeping narcissism in check—on social media!
The brief narcissism test is informal, not diagnostic. For a more accurate picture and to pin point where you are in the spectrum, you’ll need to take the full test included in Rethinking Narcissism.
A final note from Dr. Craig Malkin
I hope this informal narcissism assessment has been helpful to you! I’m on a mission to address the “narcissism epidemic” by illuminating the spectrum of narcissism, identifying ways to control the trait, and explaining how too little of it may be a bad thing. That’s the heartbeat behind my new book, Rethinking Narcissism: The Bad-and Surprising Good-About Feeling Special, which is available now. I was honored that Library Journal called the book “a true gem on the subject of narcissism” and I hope you’ll find it helpful in your life.
Will you help me spread the word about this assessment?
If you have friends that could benefit from learning more about where they fall on the spectrum, click below to share it with them and we hope you’ll join the conversation on the #SoWe hashtag on Twitter or Facebook.
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About dennisclatham

SHARING, SHEDDING, SHOWING, SOWING, SPEAKING, SPREADING, and TEACHING PROVEN SOLUTIONS being put into ACTION that only PROVES WHAT ACTUALLY WORKS.

Posted on January 9, 2016, in Dennis C. Latham. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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